December 6, 2022
schengen country list

26 Schengen Country List – Name, Flag, Area, Capital, Visa 2022

(Last Updated On: February 28, 2022)

This article will feature the Schengen visa country list, name, flag, and capital. The Schengen Agreement, which was created in 1995, includes Schengen nations. The Schengen region is a zone in which 26 European countries have agreed to eliminate their internal borders in order to allow free and unrestricted movement of people, commodities, and services. The Schengen nations all follow the same regulations when it comes to regulating their exterior borders.

What is Schengen?

Schengen is a European zone made up of 26 nations whose internal borders have been removed. Instead, these nations have all concentrated on fortifying their exterior boundaries. Citizens of the Schengen Zone are free to travel from one nation to another inside the Schengen Zone as if it were a single country.

The Schengen Area encompasses the bulk of Europe and includes some of the continent’s most powerful and oldest nations. The majority of the countries are also members of the EU union. Other nations, such as Switzerland and Lichtenstein, which are not members of the EU but are part of the Schengen Zone, nevertheless, enjoy free movement within this region.

It now has a population of roughly 400 million individuals who travel inside the Schengen area 1.2 billion times every year.

The name “Schengen” derives from the tiny winery town and commune of Schengen in far southeastern Luxembourg, where the Schengen Agreement was signed by France, Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands.

Schengen Agreement

The initial initiative that led to the signing of the Schengen Agreement was undertaken by France and Germany. On June 17, 1984, both nations took the first move toward the formation of a visa-free, passport-less zone when they raised the topic at the European Council in Fontainebleau.

The Schengen Agreement was signed on June 14, 1985, by the governments of Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands. According to the deal, the five nations would gradually phase down border inspections at their shared borders. This article will let you know about Schengen visa country list.

After five years, the agreement’s concrete implementation began. The same nations gathered on June 19, 1990, to sign a convention on the implementation of the Schengen accord, which covered:

  • Internal border controls are being phased out.
  • Procedures for issuing standard visas are being defined.
  • The SIS database’s operation,
  • The creation of a system that allows internal and immigration officials to work together.

Only a few months later, Italy became the first country to join Schengen, followed by Spain and Portugal. In February 2008, Liechtenstein became the final country to sign.

France and Germany took the first move that led to the signing of the Schengen Agreement. When they addressed the issue at the European Council in Fontainebleau on June 17, 1984, both countries made the first step toward forming a visa-free, passport-free zone.

The governments of Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands signed the Schengen Agreement on June 14, 1985. The five countries agreed to gradually reduce border checks at their common borders as part of the agreement.

List of Schengen Area Countries

The Schengen region includes the following countries:

The Schengen Acquis has been completely implemented in 22 of the 26 nations, while the remaining four countries are members of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). The applicant country must fulfill the qualifying requirements in order to join the Schengen Area.

The ability of the aspirant nation to regulate the Schengen area’s external borders and issue Uniform Schengen Visas is one of the requirements. In addition, the candidate country must cooperate with law enforcement authorities from other Schengen members. The aspiring nation must pass the Schengen Evaluation while applying to become a Schengen country. When a nation joins the Schengen Area, a magazine is published.

Nationalities from other nations can freely enter the internal boundaries of Schengen countries without being subjected to border procedures. Schengen member nations adopt uniform rules for crossing external borders and provide applicants with standardized entrance and short-stay visa norms.

Through a common database known as the Schengen Information System, coordination among the Schengen nations’ law enforcement agencies provides an efficient method for combating crime (SIS).

Schengen visa country list

  1. Austria
  2. Belgium
  3. Czech Republic
  4. Denmark
  5. Estonia
  6. Finland
  7. France
  8. Germany
  9. Greece
  10. Hungary
  11. Iceland
  12. Italy
  13. Latvia
  14. Liechtenstein
  15. Lithuania
  16. Luxembourg
  17. Malta
  18. Netherlands
  19. Norway
  20. Poland
  21. Portugal
  22. Slovakia
  23. Slovenia
  24. Spain
  25. Sweden
  26. Switzerland

Nationalities from other nations must get a visa before visiting any of the Schengen visa country list. Applicants must complete an application form and submit it together with their passport, passport-size pictures, travel health insurance, a cover letter outlining the purpose of the trip, airline schedule, lodging details, evidence of adequate cash, and other required papers. The applicant may be required to submit extra papers depending on the visa type.

Schengen visa country list and capitals

Country Capital
Austria Vienna
Belgium Brussels
Czech Republic Prague
Denmark Copenhagen
Estonia Tallinn
France Paris
Germany Berlin
Greece Athens
Hungary Budapest
Iceland Reykjavik
Italy Rome
Latvia Riga
Liechtenstein Vaduz
Lithuania Vilnius
Luxembourg Luxemburg
Malta Valletta
Netherlands Amsterdam, The Hague
Norway Oslo
Poland Warsaw
Slovakia Bratislava
Slovenia Ljubljana
Spain Madrid
Sweden Stockholm
Switzerland Berne

 

Flags of Schengen Countries

Austria
Austria
Belgium
Belgium
Czech Republic
Czech Republic
Denmark
Denmark
Estonia
Estonia
Finland
Finland
France
France
Germany
Germany
Greece
Greece
Hungary
Hungary
Iceland
Iceland
Italy
Italy
Latvia
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Luxembourg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/73/Flag_of_Malta.svg/1200px-Flag_of_Malta.svg.png
Malta
Netherlands
Netherlands
Norway
Norway
Poland
Poland
Portugal
Portugal
Slovakia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Slovenia
Spain
Spain
Sweden
Sweden
Switzerland
Switzerland

10 Easiest Schengen Countries to Obtain a Schengen Visa

You will be introduced to each of the top 10 Schengen Area nations with the highest rate of Schengen visa from the country list issued in 2018, starting with the leading country and working your way down to the last of the top 10 Schengen Area countries with the highest rate of Schengen visas issued in 2018.

According to the source, the following are the simplest Schengen nations to apply for a Schengen visa from:

Lithuania

In 2018, just 1.3 percent of short-term visa applications were refused in Lithuania, making it the simplest nation to obtain a Schengen visa from. In all, 98.7% of those who applied for a Schengen Visa to visit Lithuania received a favorable response.

Furthermore, when it comes to the overall number of short-term visa applications received, Lithuania is somewhere in the center of the pack. This also implies that making an appointment will take less time. Unlike Germany and France, where applicants must arrange an appointment several months in advance of their intended travel to Schengen, many other countries need applicants to schedule an appointment several months in advance of their planned trip to Schengen.

Estonia

According to the 2018 rejection statistics, another Baltic nation is among the easiest to obtain a visa from. Only 1.6 percent of applications submitted to Estonian embassies overseas were denied, while the remaining 98.4 percent were granted a Schengen Area short-term visa.

Estonia is also the sixth Schengen nation with the fewest visa applications, implying that its embassies are less congested.

Finland

Despite the large number of visa applications it receives each year, Finland remains a very straightforward Schengen nation to obtain a visa from. With just 1.7 percent of applications rejected at its consulates overseas, you have a good chance of getting a Schengen Visa to Finland.

Iceland

Iceland is a fantastic option to acquire a visa to the Schengen Area, with the fewest Schengen Visa applications received in 2018 and just 1.7 percent of applications refused. However, because Iceland is largely represented by other nations and does not have many consulates of its own, you should first examine where you need to apply. This implies that if the Icelandic embassy is busy, you will have to wait a little longer for an appointment.

Latvia

Latvia is the sixth Schengen nation from which obtaining a Schengen visa is simpler. As a result, all three Baltic nations are perfect for applying for a Schengen visa. You have a strong probability of getting a visa from this nation, with 97.9% of applications received and only 2.1 percent denied.

Poland

A visa is also easy to get in the Republic of Poland. Despite a 0.9 discrepancy with Latvia, applicants seeking a Schengen visa to Poland have a 97 percent probability of receiving a favorable response. Only 3% of visa applications were denied in the Central European country, a part of Schengen visa country list.

Luxembourg

Luxembourg, a small landlocked country, maybe your gateway to Schengen, especially if you want to visit its neighbors, France, Germany, and Belgium. With a rejection rate of 3.7 percent, it’s easy to see why. Luxembourg, which is also the nation with the fewest Schengen visa applications, appears to be an excellent deal for Schengen visa seekers.

Slovakia

Applicants who apply for a Schengen visa at a Slovak consulate have a 95.8% probability of getting accepted. Slovak embassies throughout the world rejected 4.2 percent of the 26,797 applications they received in 2018, making it the Schengen country with the fewest applications.

Czech Republic

In comparison to the 12 percent of what was once Czechoslovakia (yep, we’re talking about Slovakia), those asking for a short-term visa in the Czech Republic have a larger probability of being denied. With a 95.3 percent acceptance rate, you still have a good chance of earning a favorable response to your application.

Greece

Things have changed since 2014 when Greece had a rejection rate of under 2%. If you apply for a Schengen visa in Germany now, you have a 4.9 percent chance of being denied. The Greek embassies across the world approved 95.1 percent of the applications they received last year. With 855,285 applications received last year, Greece is the sixth most popular nation for people planning to enter the Schengen region for short-term visits.

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How long is a Schengen visa valid?

Stay for a short time (type C) Schengen visas are valid for 90 days, but long-stay (type D) visas are good for anything from six months to five years. Learn about the benefits and drawbacks of overstaying your Schengen visa in the sections below.

90 days for Type C (brief stays).

Stay for a short time (type C) For the following reasons, Schengen visas enable you to travel inside the Schengen Area for a maximum of 90 days (3 months): tourist, business, family visit, short educational program, internship, and paid activity.

The type C Schengen visa is given for single, double, or numerous entries depending on the purpose for travel and your condition.

– The single entry Schengen visa allows you to visit the Schengen Area once and stay for up to 90 days.

The Schengen visa’s validity corresponds to the dates specified in the application. The Schengen visa (circulation visa) permits for several travels of up to 90 days each, spread out over a maximum of 180 days.

For type C Schengen visas, the term of stay within the Schengen Area is always 90 days, however, the validity of the Schengen visa itself may change. The validity of Schengen visas for duplicate or repeated entrance (circulation visa) ranges from 6 months to 5 years. Over a 180-day term, the holder may travel one or more times for up to 90 days.

The Schengen visa’s validity is stated on the visa that is connected to the traveler’s passport. It depends on your motives for visiting the Schengen Area, your position, and if you have followed the terms of your prior visas.

4 to 12 months for Type D (extended stays).

Stay for a while (type D) All Schengen visas are good for four to twelve months. There is no time restriction of 90 days. The Schengen visa is valid for the same amount of time as the permitted journey. There are numerous types, depending on the reason for travel and the duration of stay:

– A long-stay visa that functions similarly to a residence permit (VLS-TS). This long-stay visa is valid for 4 to 12 months and is for students, permanent employees, spouses of French nationals, and talented passports.

– The long-stay visa with the need to “apply for a residence permit within 2 months of arrival” allows the bearer to enter the country and complete the documentation required to get a resident permit at the prefecture. The validity of the residence permit determines the length of stay in the Schengen Area. Families of French nationals, independent or liberal professions, employees or family members of workers, retirees or spouses of pensioners, and artists are all eligible for this visa.

– Working holiday visas are available. The working vacation visa is valid for one year and is for foreign residents from countries that have signed a bilateral agreement and want to travel the country while working.

– A minor visa is required to attend school. This Schengen visa, which is valid for 11 months, is for minors under the age of 18 who will be attending school for more than 3 months and whose parents reside overseas.

– The visa for a long-term stay is transitory. The temporary long-stay visa is valid for 4 to 6 months and can be given to tourists who want to enroll in a short educational program, work as an artist, or just remain in the country (with their existing resources only).

Area, Population and date of implementation of the Schengen country list

State Area
(km2)
Population
(2018)
Date
signed
Date of first
implementation
 Austria 83,871 8,891,388 28 April 1995 1 December 1997
 Belgium 30,528 11,482,178 14 June 1985 26 March 1995
 Czech Republic 78,866 10,665,677 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Denmark
       (excluding  Greenland and the  Faroe Islands, but see
43,094 5,752,126 19 December 1996 25 March 2001
 Estonia 45,338 1,322,920 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Finland 338,145 5,522,576 19 December 1996 25 March 2001
 France
       (excluding overseas departments and collectivities)
551,695 64,990,511 14 June 1985 26 March 1995
 Germany
       (previously excluding Büsingen am Hochrhein)
357,022 83,124,418 14 June 1985 26 March 1995
 Greece 131,990 10,522,246 6 November 1992 1 January 2000
 Hungary 93,030 9,707,499 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Iceland 103,000 336,713 19 December 1996
18 May 1999
25 March 2001
 Italy 301,318 60,627,291 27 November 1990 26 October 1997
 Latvia 64,589 1,928,459 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Liechtenstein 160 37,910 28 February 2008 19 December 2011
 Lithuania 65,300 2,801,264 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Luxembourg 2,586 604,245 14 June 1985 26 March 1995
 Malta 316 439,248 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Netherlands
       (excluding Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten and the Caribbean Netherlands)
41,526 17,059,560 14 June 1985 26 March 1995
 Norway
       (excluding Svalbard)
385,155 5,337,962 19 December 1996
18 May 1999
25 March 2001
 Poland 312,683 37,921,592 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Portugal 92,391 10,256,193 25 June 1991 26 March 1995
 Slovakia 49,037 5,453,014 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Slovenia 20,273 2,077,837 16 April 2003 21 December 2007
 Spain
       (with special provisions for Ceuta and Melilla)
505,990 46,692,858 25 June 1991 26 March 1995
 Sweden 449,964 9,971,638 19 December 1996 25 March 2001
  Switzerland
       (with Büsingen am Hochrhein)
41,285 8,525,611 26 October 2004 12 December 2008
 Schengen Area 4,189,111 417,597,460 14 June 1985 26 March 1995

Source

What are the consequences of overstaying a Schengen visa?

You risk incurring a fine and/or being recognized upon departing the country if you do not leave the Schengen Area when your Schengen visa expires. This identification will have ramifications for your future visits to the Schengen Area.

Remember that obtaining a Schengen visa is not automatic. Your application will be evaluated by the relevant authorities of the Schengen nation to which you are traveling, who will take into consideration any prior visas you have been granted as well as any overstays. If you violate the validity of a Schengen visa, you risk having future Schengen visa applications denied.

Can you extend a Schengen visa?

Yes, the Schengen visa’s validity and/or duration of stay (up to 90 days) can be renewed. You must apply with the appropriate authorities before the visa’s validity term expires and/or the 90-day on-site duration expires. You must apply at the prefecture, but be aware that the responsible authorities differ from one Schengen Area nation to the next.

You must provide a compelling cause that you could not have expected when you received your Schengen visa if you want your Schengen visa extended. The relevant authorities will determine whether your compelling reason qualifies as force majeure (an occurrence that occurred during your visit to the Schengen Area and prevents you from departing) or personal impact. Personal reasons include:

– work-related reasons: an unexpected incident Employer letter as proof.

– medical reasons: the patient is unable to travel due to sickness and/or unforeseen treatment. Proof: a medical certificate from a hospital stating the required amount of days.

– personal reasons: important family events Evidence: proof of relationship, parent’s death certificate, or medical certificate establishing serious sickness and the need for the applicant, or a medical certificate or document confirming the accident, its repercussions, and the need for the applicant in France.

– for professional reasons: an unanticipated incident Employer letter as proof.

– medical reasons: the patient is unable to travel due to sickness and/or unforeseen treatment. Proof: a medical certificate from a hospital stating the required amount of days.

– personal reasons: important family events Evidence: proof of relationship, parent’s death certificate, or medical certificate establishing serious sickness and the need for the applicant in France, or a medical certificate or document confirming the accident, its repercussions, and the need for the applicant.

According to the source, Non-Schengen countries you can visit with a Schengen visa not added in the actual Schengen country list:

  • Albania
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Belarus
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bulgaria
  • Colombia
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Georgia
  • Gibraltar
  • Kosovo
  • Montenegro
  • North Macedonia
  • Romania
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Serbia
  • Turkey

Hopefully, this article on Schengen visa country list will help you a lot with required information!

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